Analyzing the Obvious, My Concept Experience

My second nugget post was about this “man-computer symbiosis” and how it related to my inquiry topic, Pandora. I thought about technology and music and came up with the obvious statement: people like music. I began to research this and realized that actually, some people don’t like music. One of the first things I came to was this video that explained what the heck is wrong with these people that just don’t enjoy music. Then I came to this article from the Huffington Post that said some people experience what is called “musical anhedonia.” Well what in the world in music anhedonia? And how do you even pronounce that? The article went into detail about an experiment to discover which people had music anhedonia, but it didn’t really explain what it was so I decided to Google this question to find out more. Automatically there were a number of article that came up saying, “Why some people just don’t like music.” I clicked on a UK website with the curiosity of what it would say. This article explained that some people are just incapable of having an emotional response to music. Most people’s heart rate increases and sometimes begin to sweat when they hear a song they like, but these individuals do not. Well now I’m wondering why they aren’t as sensitive as other people? Did they have a bad experience with music as a child? Are people born liking music? I Googled again and surprisingly found a few interviews with musicians explaining how they got into music, and then came to an article by a man who wanted to understand what determines why other people like certain music as well. In the “Before Birth” section of his article, he included some links related to pregnant mothers playing classical music near their stomachs and I clicked on one. Apparently, “listening” to music in the womb plays a huge role on our emotions and how you will develop. Perhaps it’s possible that people with musical anhedonia never heard music in the womb and never developed the emotional response needed to enjoy it. So, in conclusion, if a baby doesn’t experience music in the womb, they will prove my “obvious” statement wrong that people like music.

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5 responses to “Analyzing the Obvious, My Concept Experience

  1. Lina Ibrahim

    I think this is so cool and super interesting I LOVE music and anything that has to do with it. Personally, I find it really weird that some people do not like music at all, especially since there are so many different genres. But you specifically describe the process of getting closer to what you want to do for your project, which is great! It should be really exciting, so I will be looking forward to your topic!

    • Lina Ibrahim

      I think this is so cool and super interesting I LOVE music and anything that has to do with it. Personally, I find it really weird that some people do not like music at all, especially since there are so many different genres. But you specifically describe the process of getting closer to what you want to do for your project, which is great! Another way you can look at this topic would be by being more specific, what about music interests you? Once you can answer that you get get even more specific and ask yourself, questions such as, What is it about certain genres that causes people to like and dislike them? That way you can relate the type of music you like with the inquiry project which will make it a little more personal. It should be really exciting, so I will be looking forward to your topic!!

  2. Your research really took you to some interesting topics and questions! I’ve never heard of this disorder before (is it a disorder? It sure sounds tragic to me) and it’s really interesting to hear about something that I truly can’t comprehend. I regard music as something that is appreciated and made by humans as a result of some creative and linguistic affinity that resides in the core of both cultural and biological existence. Evidently there exist outliers even in something that I always assumed was as inherently human as opposable thumbs. I mean, music-loving is like the thumb of the soul. Or, I guess not. We really are a complicated species I guess. Super interesting research!

  3. This is definitely something I have never heard of before. It’s incredible where the internet can take you if you just go looking for it. You could probably hone this question in even further and ask what is the psychological difference between those who enjoy music and those who don’t, focusing on key traits such as personality and thinking pathways. One of the cooler research topics I’ve seen by far.

  4. I’ve never thought about people who dislike music altogether (as opposed to disliking a specific genre or artist), so I like reading about this different topic.
    You asked some good questions about when people realize they don’t like music and how that possibly develops, but I think a couple more hours of research and you could’ve answered that in this blog post (which seems a bit early if this is the direction you want your paper to go in). I’m trying to think of other questions and places this new information can take you. Is there another way to tie Pandora into your research? Do you think the layout of Pandora change the way listeners interpret the music; how they can only skip songs so many times and they can’t choose specific songs? Do you think it could lead to people disliking a genre they once enjoyed? (I’m just throwing ideas out there, sorry it’s a bit off topic). Awesome research!

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